Commit fef195c9 authored by Cory Quammen's avatar Cory Quammen Committed by Kitware Robot

Merge topic 'update-for-5.6'

f2d78513 More minor changes
cb19ed7f Updated figures
6094404d Added description of animation time format
7e79f576 Update Automatic Rescale Range Mode docs
04255486 Add ClearSelection icon
8d38d9b7 Update settings dialog
53a184df Updated Save Animation settings
9b1e0168 Change DPI of images to 200
...
Acked-by: Kitware Robot's avatarKitware Robot <kwrobot@kitware.com>
Acked-by: Utkarsh Ayachit's avatarUtkarsh Ayachit <utkarsh.ayachit@kitware.com>
Merge-request: !80
parents d01f71c0 f2d78513
Pipeline #126968 passed with stage
in 0 seconds
......@@ -14,7 +14,7 @@ image files (one image per animation frame) or to a movie file. The geometry
rendered at each frame can also be saved in \ParaView's PVD file format, which
can be loaded back into \ParaView as a time varying dataset.
\section{Animation View.}
\section{Animation View}
\ui{Animation View} is the user interface used to create animations by adding
keyframes. It is modeled similar to popular animation and keyframe editing
......@@ -30,8 +30,9 @@ applications with the ability to create tracks for animating multiple parameters
\end{figure}
As seen in Figure~\ref{fig:AnimationView}, this view is presented as a table.
Above the table are the controls that administers how time progresses in the
animation. These were discussed previously. Within the table, the tracks of the
Above the table are controls that administer how time progresses in the
animation. These were discussed briefly in Section \ref{sec:DealingWithTime}.
Within the table, the tracks of the
animation appear as rows, and animation time is presented as increasing from
left-to-right. The first row in the table, simply labeled \texttt{Time}, shows
the total span of time that the animation can cover. The current displayed time
......
......@@ -46,7 +46,7 @@ defaults.
To get a better look at the available customizations, let's look at various
visualizations possible and then see how you can set those up using the
properties on the \ui{Edit Axes Grid} dialog. In these examples, we use the
\texttt{disk\_out\_ref.ex2} example dataset distributed with ParaView.
\texttt{disk\_out\_ref.ex2} example dataset packaged with ParaView.
\begin{center}
\includegraphics[width=0.4\linewidth]{Images/AxesGridBasic.png}
......@@ -59,7 +59,7 @@ Grid} will generate such a visualization. The axes places always stay behind the
rendered geometry even as you interact with the scene. As you zoom in and out,
the labels and ticks will be updated based on visual cues.
Now to show a grid along the axes planes, alined with the ticks and labels, turn
To show a grid along the axes planes, aligned with the ticks and labels, turn
on the \ui{Show Grid} checkbox, resulting in a visualization on the right.
By default, the gridded faces are always the farthest faces i.e. they stay behind
......@@ -104,7 +104,7 @@ as follows (below, left).
\end{center}
Here we see that both sides of the axis plane are
labelled. Suppose you only want to label one of the sides, in that case use the
labeled. Suppose you only want to label one of the sides, in that case use the
\ui{Axes To Label} property to uncheck all but \ui{Min-X} and \ui{Min-Y}. This
will result in the visualization shown above, right.
......@@ -124,7 +124,7 @@ render view.
\end{python}
All properties on the \ui{Axes Grid} that you set using the \ui{Edit Axes Grid}
dialog are avialble on this \py{axesGrid} object and can be changed as follows:
dialog are available on this \py{axesGrid} object and can be changed as follows:
\begin{python}
>>> axesGrid.XTitle = 'X Title'
......@@ -136,7 +136,7 @@ Note you can indeed use the tracing capabilities described in
Section~\ref{sec:PythonTracing} to determine what Python API to use to change a
specific property on the \ui{Edit Axes Grid} dialog or use \py{help}.
\begin{python}
\begin{python-no-highlighting}
>>> help(axesGrid)
Help on GridAxes3DActor in module paraview.servermanager object:
......@@ -173,4 +173,4 @@ class GridAxes3DActor(Proxy)
| translation applied to the dataset.
|
...
\end{python}
\end{python-no-highlighting}
This diff is collapsed.
......@@ -4,7 +4,7 @@ basic form, you can indeed use \ParaView's ability to show multiple views side b
side to set up simultaneous visualizations. But, that can get cumbersome too
quickly. Let's take a look at a simple example: Let's say you want to do a parameter
study where you want to compare isosurfaces generated by a set of isovalues in a
dataset. To set such a visualization up, you'll need to first create as many
dataset. To set up such a visualization, you'll need to first create as many
\ui{Render View}s as isovalues. Then, create just as many \ui{Contour} filters,
setting each one up with a right isovalue for the contour to generate and
display the result in one of the views. As the number of isovalues increases,
......@@ -21,8 +21,8 @@ all the internal views simultaneously. Any display property changes, such as
scalar coloring and representation type are also maintained consistently between
these internal views. The interactions in the internal views are linked, so when
you interact with one, all other views update as well. While this is all
nice and well, where the real power of \ui{Comparative View}s becomes apparent
is when you set up a parameter to vary across the views. This parameter can be
nice and well, the real power of \ui{Comparative View}s becomes apparent
when you set up a parameter to vary across the views. This parameter can be
any of the properties on the pipeline modules such as filter properties and
opacity, or it could be the data time. Each of these internal views will
now render the result obtained by setting the parameter as per your selection.
......@@ -74,7 +74,7 @@ configure the active comparative view.}
To configure the comparative view itself, you must to use the
\ui{Comparative View Inspector} (Figure~\ref{fig:ComparativeViewInspector})
accessible from the \menu{View} menu. The
\ui{Comparative View Inspector} is a dockable panel that becomes enabled when the
\ui{Comparative View Inspector} is a dockable panel that is enabled when the
active view is a comparative view.
To change how many internal views are used in the active comparative view and
......@@ -149,7 +149,7 @@ easier to fill the cells with a range of values, you can click and drag over
multiple cells. When you release the mouse, a dialog will prompt you to enter
the data value range (Figure~\ref{fig:ComparativeViewRangeDialog}).
In case you selected a combination of rows and columns,
the dialog will also let you select in which direction must the parameter be varied
the dialog will also let you select in which direction the parameter is varied
using the range specified. You can choose to vary the parameter horizontally
first, vertically first, or only along one of the directions while keeping the
other constant. This is useful when doing a study with multiple parameters.
......
......@@ -2,7 +2,7 @@ In a visualization pipeline, data sources bring data into the system for
processing and visualization. Sources, such as the \ui{Sphere} source
(accessible from the \ui{Sources} menu in \paraview),
programmatically create datasets for
processing. Another type of data sources is readers. Readers can read data
processing. Another type of data sources are readers. Readers can read data
written out in disk files or other databases and bring it into \ParaView for
processing. \ParaView includes readers that can read several of the
commonly used scientific data formats. It's also possible to write plugins that
......@@ -10,7 +10,7 @@ add support for new or proprietary file formats.
\ParaView provides several sample datasets for you to get started. You can
download an archive with several types of data files from the download page at
\url{http://paraview.org}.
\url{https://www.paraview.org/download} under the Data section.
\section{Opening data files in \texttt{paraview}}
......@@ -39,7 +39,7 @@ to note.
\begin{itemize}
\item The \ui{Favorites} pane shows some platform-specific common locations such
as your home directory and desktop.
\item The \ui{Recent Directories} pane shows a few most recently used
\item The \ui{Recent Directories} pane shows a few of the most recently used
directories.
\end{itemize}
......@@ -81,9 +81,9 @@ override this behavior from the \ui{Settings} dialog.
\subsection{Dealing with unknown extensions}
On occasion, you will run into situations where a file is named unusually and,
On occasion, you will run into situations where a file has an unusual name and,
despite the fact that \ParaView supports reading the file format,
\paraview does not recognize the file, as its extension does not
\paraview does not recognize the file because its extension does not
match the expected extension. In this case, \paraview will pop
up the \ui{Open Data With...} dialog, which lists several readers
(Figure~\ref{fig:OpenDataWithDialog}).
......@@ -104,9 +104,11 @@ use for a file with an unknown extension.} % FIXME: The filename in the dialog i
Error messages in \paraview are shown in the \ui{Output Messages}
window (Figure~\ref{fig:OutputMessagesWindow}).
It is accessible from the \menu{Tools > Output Window} menu.
It is accessible from the \menu{View > Output Messages} menu.
Whenever there's a new error message, \paraview will
automatically pop open this window and raise it to the top.
automatically pop open this window and raise it to the top. This window can
be attached, or docked, in the main window so that it is visible with the
other user interface elements without covering them up.
\index{keyword}{Error messages}\keyword{Output Messages}
\begin{figure}[htb]
......@@ -152,6 +154,7 @@ where \emph{foo} could be any filename, \emph{N} is a numeral sequence (with
any number of leading zeros), and \emph{vtk} could be any extension.
\subsection{Dealing with time}
\label{sec:DealingWithTime}
When you open a dataset with time, either as a file series or in a file format
that natively supports time, \paraview will automatically setup an
......@@ -174,7 +177,7 @@ further customize it, as discussed in Chapter~\ref{chapter:Animation}.
\paraview remembers most recently opened files (or file series).
Simply use the \menu{File > Recent Files} menu. \paraview also
remembers the reader type selected for files with unknown extensions or for occasions when
multiple reader choices were available. \menu{Recent Files}
multiple reader choices were available.
\subsection{Opening files using command line options}
......@@ -203,7 +206,7 @@ a `.' For example, to open a file series named \directory{my0.vtk}, \directory{
of these have different properties available to you to customize how the data is
read and can vary greatly depending on the capabilities of the file format
itself or the particular reader implementation. Let's look at some of the
properties generally available on readers.
properties commonly available in readers.
\subsubsection{Selecting data arrays}
\label{sec:SelectingDataArrays}
......@@ -233,15 +236,15 @@ the filters in the pipeline do not have to process them.
\end{center}
\end{didyouknow}
The UI for selecting the arrays to load is simply a list with the names of the
The user interface for selecting the arrays to load is simply a list with the names of the
arrays and a checkbox indicating whether that array is to be loaded or not
(Figure~\ref{fig:ArrayStatusWidget}). Icons, such as
\icon{Images/pqCellData16.png} and \icon{Images/pqNodalData16.png} are often
used in this widget to give you an indication of whether the array is
cell-centered or point-centered, respectively.
If you unselected an array but realize, as you're setting up your visualization pipeline,
that you need that data array, you can always go back to the
If you initially de-select an array, but then as you're setting up your visualization pipeline
realize that you need that data array, you can always go back to the
\ui{Properties} page for the reader by making the reader active in the
\ui{Pipeline Browser} and then changing the array selection. \ParaView will
automatically re-execute any processing pipeline set up on the reader with this
......@@ -252,9 +255,9 @@ Remember to hit \ui{Apply} (or use \ui{Auto Apply}) after changing the array
selection for the change to take effect.
\end{commonerrors}
Sometimes this list can get quite large, and it can become cumbersome to find the
array for which you are looking. To help with such situations,
\paraview provides a mechanism to search lists. Click inside the
Sometimes the list of data arrays can get quite large, and it can
become cumbersome to find the array for which you are looking. To help
with such situations, \paraview provides a mechanism to search lists. Click inside the
widget to make it get the \emph{focus}. Then type \keys{\ctrl+F} (or
\keys{\cmdmac+F}) to get a search widget. Now you can type in the text to
search. Matching rows will be highlighted (Figure~\ref{fig:SearchInLists}).
......@@ -291,9 +294,9 @@ To open data files using the scripting interface, \ParaView provides the
\begin{python}
>>> reader = OpenDataFile(".../ParaViewData/Data/can.ex2")
>>> if reader:
... print "Success"
... print("Success")
... else:
... print "Failed"
... print("Failed")
...
\end{python}
......@@ -311,7 +314,7 @@ its name, similar to other sources and filters.
To find out information about the reader created and the properties available on it,
you can use the \py{help} function.
\begin{python}
\begin{python-no-highlighting}
>>> reader = ExodusIIReader(FileName=".../ParaViewData/Data/can.ex2")
>>> help(reader)
Help on ExodusIIReader in module paraview.servermanager object:
......@@ -342,14 +345,14 @@ class ExodusIIReader(ExodusIIReaderProxy)
| turned 'off', the user can explicitly add them by applying
| a warp filter.
| ...
\end{python}
\end{python-no-highlighting}
\begin{didyouknow}
The \py{help} function can be used to get information about properties available on
any source or filter instance. It not only lists the properties, but also
provides information about how they affect the pipeline module. \py{help} can
also be used on functions. For example:
\begin{python}
\begin{python-no-highlighting}
>>> help(OpenDataFile)
Help on function OpenDataFile in module paraview.simple:
......@@ -359,7 +362,7 @@ OpenDataFile(filename, **extraArgs)
This uses extension matching to determine the best reader
possible. If a reader cannot be identified, then this
returns None.
\end{python}
\end{python-no-highlighting}
\end{didyouknow}
\subsection{Handling temporal file series}
......@@ -429,11 +432,11 @@ select the point data arrays to load. Let's use this as an example.
# To query/print the current status for `PointVariables' property,
# we do what we would have done for any other property:
>>> print GetProperty("PointVariables")
>>> print(GetProperty("PointVariables"))
['DISPL', 'VEL', 'ACCL']
# An alternative way of doing the same is as follows:
>>> print reader.PointVariables
>>> print(reader.PointVariables)
['DISPL', 'VEL', 'ACCL']
# To set the property, simply set it to list containing the names to
......@@ -445,11 +448,11 @@ select the point data arrays to load. Let's use this as an example.
>>> reader.PointVariables = ['DISPL']
# Now, the new value for PointVariables is:
>>> print reader.PointVariables
>>> print(reader.PointVariables)
['DISPL']
# To determine the array available, use:
>>> print reader.PointVariables.Available
>>> print(reader.PointVariables.Available)
['DISPL', 'VEL', 'ACCL']
# These are the arrays available in the file.
\end{python}
......@@ -470,21 +473,21 @@ does not re-execute until a re-execution is requested either by calling
>>> UpdatePipeline(proxy=reader)
# Print the list of point arrays read in.
>>> print reader.PointData[:]
>>> print(reader.PointData[:])
[Array: ACCL, Array: DISPL, Array: GlobalNodeId, Array: PedigreeNodeId, Array: VEL]
# Change the selection.
>>> reader.PointVariables = ['DISPL']
# Print the list of point arrays read in, nothing changes!
>>> print reader.PointData[:]
>>> print(reader.PointData[:])
[Array: ACCL, Array: DISPL, Array: GlobalNodeId, Array: PedigreeNodeId, Array: VEL]
# Update the pipeline.
>>> UpdatePipeline()
# Now the arrays read in has indeed changed as we expected.
>>> print reader.PointData[:]
>>> print(reader.PointData[:])
[Array: DISPL, Array: GlobalNodeId, Array: PedigreeNodeId]
\end{python}
......@@ -512,7 +515,7 @@ file series.
\begin{figure}[htb]
\begin{center}
\includegraphics[width=0.5\linewidth]{Images/ReloadOptions.png}
\caption{\ui{Reload Options} dialog allowing you to choose how to refresh the
\caption{The \ui{Reload Options} dialog allows you to choose how to refresh the
reader.}
\label{fig:ReloadOptions}
\end{center}
......@@ -522,7 +525,6 @@ Similar to \paraview, in \pvpython, you use \py{ReloadFiles} to reload existing
\py{ExtendFilesSeries} to look for new files in a file series.
\begin{python}
# For file being modified in place per timestep
>>> reader = OpenDataFile(file)
...
......
This diff is collapsed.
This diff is collapsed.
......@@ -227,5 +227,5 @@ range of values, consider using the \ui{Contour} filter to generate surfaces at
the ends of the range rather than extract all of the cells with the
\ui{Threshold} filter. Be aware that substituting filters can have an effect on
downstream filters. For example, running the \ui{Histogram} filter after
\ui{Threshold} will have an entirely different effect then running it after the
\ui{Threshold} will have an entirely different effect than running it after the
roughly equivalent \ui{Contour} filter.
ParaView/Images/ColorMapEditor.png

303 KB | W: | H:

ParaView/Images/ColorMapEditor.png

188 KB | W: | H:

ParaView/Images/ColorMapEditor.png
ParaView/Images/ColorMapEditor.png
ParaView/Images/ColorMapEditor.png
ParaView/Images/ColorMapEditor.png
  • 2-up
  • Swipe
  • Onion skin
ParaView/Images/FavoritesManager.png

41.3 KB | W: | H:

ParaView/Images/FavoritesManager.png

180 KB | W: | H:

ParaView/Images/FavoritesManager.png
ParaView/Images/FavoritesManager.png
ParaView/Images/FavoritesManager.png
ParaView/Images/FavoritesManager.png
  • 2-up
  • Swipe
  • Onion skin
ParaView/Images/SettingsDialog.png

315 KB | W: | H:

ParaView/Images/SettingsDialog.png

365 KB | W: | H:

ParaView/Images/SettingsDialog.png
ParaView/Images/SettingsDialog.png
ParaView/Images/SettingsDialog.png
ParaView/Images/SettingsDialog.png
  • 2-up
  • Swipe
  • Onion skin
......@@ -200,7 +200,7 @@ interpreter that runs Python scripts for \ParaView. The one difference is that,
\pvpython is meant to run interactive scripts, \pvbatch
is designed for batch processing. Additionally, when running on computing
resources with MPI capabilities, \pvbatch can be run in parallel. We
will cover this in more detail in Section \fixme{reference}.
will cover this in more detail in Section~\ref{sec:UsingPVBatch}.
\subsubsection{\texttt{pvserver}}
......@@ -264,7 +264,7 @@ menu), for undo/redo (\menu{Edit} menu), for the toggle panel, and for toolbar v
generate test datasets of various types (\menu{Sources} menu), as well new
filters for processing data (\menu{Filters} menu). The \menu{Tools} menu
provides access to some of the advanced features in \paraview such as
managing plugins and accessing the embedded Python shell.
managing plugins and favorites.
Panels provide you with the ability to peek into the application's state. For example, you can
inspect the visualization pipeline that has been set up (\ui{Pipeline
......@@ -322,7 +322,7 @@ Figure~\ref{fig:CreateSphere1}.
\end{center}
\end{figure}
A few of things to note:
A few things to note:
\begin{enumerate}
\item A pipeline module is added in the \ui{Pipeline Browser} panel with a name
derived from the menu item, as is highlighted.
......@@ -431,7 +431,7 @@ Apply}. You can also change the \ui{Auto Apply} state using the
As per the data-flow paradigm, one creates pipelines with
filters to transform data. Similar to the \menu{Sources} menu, which allows us to
create new data sources, there's a \menu{Filters} menu that provides access to
the large set of filters that are available in \ParaView. If you peruse through the
the large set of filters that are available in \ParaView. If you peruse the
items in this menu, some of them will be enabled, and some of them will be
disabled. Filters that can work with the data type being produced by the sphere
source are enabled, while others are disabled. You can click on any of the
......@@ -600,10 +600,10 @@ source. To query the current value of any property on the active source, use
\begin{python}
>>> radius = GetProperty("Radius")
>>> print radius
>>> print(radius)
1.0
>>> center = GetProperty("Center")
>>> print center
>>> print(center)
[1.0, 0.0, 0.0]
\end{python}
......@@ -612,13 +612,11 @@ source. To query the current value of any property on the active source, use
and introspect the pipeline module properties for the active source.
Likewise, for the \ui{Display} section of the panel, or the display properties,
we have the \py{SetDisplayProperties} and
\py{GetDisplayProperty}\fixme{inconsistency in API. Need to add
GetDisplayProperty API. No such method exists right now :p} functions.
\py{GetDisplayProperty} functions.
\begin{python}
>>> SetDisplayProperties(Opacity=0.5)
# FIXME: this function is not available yet, but here for completeness.
>>> GetDisplayProperty("Opacity")
0.5
\end{python}
......@@ -672,7 +670,7 @@ The solution is as follows:
>>> shrinksInput = GetProperty("Input")
# This is indeed the sphere instance we created earlier.
>>> print shrinksInput
>>> print(shrinksInput)
<paraview.servermanager.Sphere object at 0x11d731e90>
# Hide the sphere instance explicitly.
......@@ -687,7 +685,7 @@ Alternatively, you could also get/set the active source using the
\begin{python}
>>> shrinkInstance = GetActiveSource()
>>> print shrinkInstance
>>> print(shrinkInstance)
<paraview.servermanager.Shrink object at 0x11d731ed0>
# Get the input property for the active source, i.e. the input
......@@ -695,7 +693,7 @@ Alternatively, you could also get/set the active source using the
>>> sphereInstance = GetProperty("Input")
# This is indeed the sphere instance we created earlier.
>>> print sphereInstance
>>> print(sphereInstance)
<paraview.servermanager.Sphere object at 0x11d731e90>
# Change active source to sphere and hide it.
......@@ -734,7 +732,7 @@ It's totally okay to stick with the previous approach.
>>> sphereInstance = Sphere()
>>> sphereInstance.Radius = 1.0
>>> sphereInstance.Center[1] = 1.0
>>> print sphereInstance.Center
>>> print(sphereInstance.Center)
[0.0, 1.0, 0.0]
>>> sphereDisplay = Show(sphereInstance)
......@@ -747,7 +745,7 @@ It's totally okay to stick with the previous approach.
>>> shrinkInstance = Shrink(Input=sphereInstance,
ShrinkFactor=1.0)
>>> print shrinkInstance.ShrinkFactor
>>> print(shrinkInstance.ShrinkFactor)
1.0
>>> Hide(sphereInstance)
>>> shrinkDisplay = Show(shrinkInstance)
......@@ -790,7 +788,7 @@ until the active source, i.e., anything downstream from it, won't be updated).
>>> sphere = Sphere()
# Print the bounds for the data produced by sphere.
>>> print sphere.GetDataInformation().GetBounds()
>>> print(sphere.GetDataInformation().GetBounds())
(1e+299, -1e+299, 1e+299, -1e+299, 1e+299, -1e+299)
# The bounds are invalid -- no data has been produced yet.
......@@ -844,12 +842,12 @@ time for which the pipeline must be updated.
\section{Scripting in \texttt{paraview}}
\subsection{The \ui{Python shell}}
\subsection{The \ui{Python Shell}}
The \paraview application also provides access to an internal shell, in which
you can enter Python commands and scripts exactly as with
\pvpython. To access the Python shell in the GUI, use the
\menu{Tools > Python Shell} menu option. A dialog will pop up with a
\menu{View > Python Shell} menu option. A dialog will pop up with a
prompt exactly like \pvpython. You can try inputting commands from
the earlier section into this shell. As you type each of the commands, you will
see the user interface update after each command, e.g., when you create the
......@@ -861,14 +859,14 @@ update to reflect the change. If you change any properties or display properties
\begin{figure}[htb]
\begin{center}
\includegraphics[width=0.7\linewidth]{Images/PythonShell.png}
\caption{Python shell in \paraview provides access to the scripting
\caption{\ui{Python Shell} in \paraview provides access to the scripting
interface in the GUI.}
\label{fig:PythonShell}
\end{center}
\end{figure}
\begin{didyouknow}
The Python shell in \paraview supports auto-completion for functions
The \ui{Python Shell} in \paraview supports auto-completion for functions
and instance methods. Try hitting the \ui{Tab} key after partially typing any
command (as shown in Figure~\ref{fig:PythonShell}).
\end{didyouknow}
......
......@@ -88,3 +88,35 @@ emphstyle={\color{self}\slshape},
%
}}{}
\lstnewenvironment{python-no-highlighting}[1][]{
\lstset{
numbers=left,
numberstyle=\footnotesize,
numbersep=1em,
xleftmargin=1em,
framextopmargin=2em,
framexbottommargin=2em,
showspaces=false,
showtabs=false,
showstringspaces=false,
frame=l,
tabsize=4,
% Basic
basicstyle=\ttfamily\small\setstretch{1},
backgroundcolor=\color{Background},
language=Python,
% Comments
commentstyle=\color{Comments}\slshape,
% Strings
stringstyle=\color{Strings},
morecomment=[s][\color{Strings}]{"""}{"""},
morecomment=[s][\color{Strings}]{'''}{'''},
keywords={},
keywordstyle={\color{Keywords}\bfseries},
% additional keywords
morekeywords={[2]@invariant},
keywordstyle={[2]\color{Decorators}\slshape},
emph={self},
emphstyle={\color{self}\slshape},
%
}}{}
......@@ -12,7 +12,7 @@ memory consumption reaches a critical level, either cumulatively on the host
or in an individual rank, the corresponding GUI element will turn red, alerting
you that you are in danger of potentially being shut down. This
gives you a chance to save state and restart the job with more
nodes to aviod losing your work. On the flip side, knowing when you're not
nodes to avoid losing your work. On the flip side, knowing when you're not
close to using the full capacity of available memory can be useful to conserve
computational resources by running smaller jobs. Of course, the memory foot print
is only one factor in determining the optimal run size.
......@@ -46,11 +46,11 @@ The main UI elements are:
\item \emph{Server} : When running in client-server mode, a server group
reports statistics about the hosts where \pvserver processes are running.
\item \emph{Data Sever} : When running in client-data-render server mode, a
\item \emph{Data Server} : When running in client-data-render server mode, a
data server group reports statistics about the hosts where \pvdataserver
processes are running.
\item {Render Sever} : When running in client-data-render server mode, a render
\item {Render Server} : When running in client-data-render server mode, a render
server group reports statistics about the hosts where \pvrenderserver processes
are running.
\end{enumerate}
......
......@@ -229,6 +229,8 @@ security measures have been taken. The typical approach is to use an
SSH tunnel.
\end{commonerrors}
\fixme{Add section on SSH authentication.}
\subsection{Managing multiple clients}
\pvserver can be configured to accept connections from multiple clients at the same time.
......@@ -253,8 +255,8 @@ Note that initial value for connect-id can be set by starting the \pvserver
pvserver --connect-id=147
\end{shell}
The master client can also disable the further connections in the \ui{Collaboration Panel}.
So you can work alone and once you are ready, you may allow other people to connect
The master client can also disable further connections in the \ui{Collaboration Panel}
so you can work alone, for instance. Once you are ready, you may allow other people to connect
to the \pvserver to share a visualization. This is the default feature when \pvserver is
started with \texttt{--multi-clients --disable-further-connections}.
......@@ -401,8 +403,7 @@ To wait for reverse connections from a \pvserver in \pvpython, you use
\py{ReverseConnect} instead of \py{Connect}.
\begin{python}
# To wait for connects from a 'pvserver' on the default port
# viz. 11111
# To wait for connections from a 'pvserver' on the default port 11111
>>> ReverseConnect()
# Optionally, you can specify the port number as the argument.
......@@ -566,6 +567,25 @@ left, we see that there are many faces improperly extracted because we are
missing ghost cells. On the right, the problem is fixed by first using the
D3 filter.
\section{Ghost Cells Generator}
If your unstructured grid data is already partitioned satisfactorily but does
not have ghost cells, it is possible to generate them using the \ui{Ghost Cells Generator}
filter. This filter can be attached to a source just like the \ui{D3} filter.
Unlike \ui{D3}, it will not repartition the dataset, it will only generate
ghost cells, which is needed for some algorithms to execute correctly.
The \ui{Ghost Cells Generator} has several options. \ui{Build If Required}
tells the filter to generate ghost cells only if required by a downstream filter.
Since computing ghost cells is a computationally and communications intensive
process, turning this option on can potentially save a lot of processing time.
The \ui{Minimum Number Of Ghost Levels} specifies at least how many ghost levels
should be generated if \ui{Build If Required} is off. Downstream filters may request
more ghost levels than this minimum, in which case the \ui{Ghost Cells Generator}
will generate the requested number of ghost levels. The \ui{Use Global Ids} option
makes use of a GlobalIds array if it is present if on. If off, ghost cells are
determined by coincident points.
\section{ParaView architecture}
Before we see how to use ParaView for parallel data processing, let's take a
......@@ -704,6 +724,7 @@ processing cores when \pvserver is run with \ui{mpirun -np 4 pvserver}.}
\end{figure}
\section{Using \texttt{pvbatch}}
\label{sec:UsingPVBatch}
In Section~\ref{sec:ParallelProcessingParaView}, we said that to use parallel
processing capabilities, one has to use remote visualization, i.e., one must use
......
......@@ -56,7 +56,7 @@ is the default decimation for interactive rendering, and the right image is
ParaView's maximum decimation setting.
The 3D rendering parameters are located in the settings dialog box, which is
accessed in the menu from \menu{Edit > Settings}
accessed in the menu from the \menu{Edit > Settings} menu
(\menu{ParaView > Preferences} on the Mac). The rendering options in the dialog
are in the \ui{Render View} tab.
......@@ -102,13 +102,6 @@ whether ParaView is run in client-server mode or not. These options are
spread among several categories, and several are considered advanced.
\begin{description}
\item[\ui{Geometry Mapper Options}]~
\begin{itemize}
\item \ui{Use Display Lists}: Enable or
disable the use of display lists. Display lists are internal structures
built by graphics systems. They can potentially speed up rendering but
can also take up memory.
\end{itemize}
\item[\ui{Translucent Rendering Options}]~
\begin{itemize}
\item \ui{Depth Peeling}: Enable or disable depth peeling. Depth
......@@ -119,6 +112,8 @@ spread among several categories, and several are considered advanced.
completely incorrectly, then your graphics hardware may not be
implementing the depth peeling extensions well; try shutting off depth
peeling. \icon{Images/pqAdvanced26.png}
\item \ui{Depth Peeling for Volumes}: Include volumes in depth peeling to
correctly intermix volumes and translucent polygons.
\item \ui{Maximum Number Of Peels}: Set the maximum number of peels to use with depth peeling. Using
more peels allows more depth complexity, but allowing less peels runs
faster. You can try adjusting this parameter if translucent geometry
......@@ -139,7 +134,7 @@ spread among several categories, and several are considered advanced.
\end{description}
Note that this is not a complete list of ParaView rendering settings. We
have left out settings that do not significantly effect rendering
have left out settings that do not significantly affect rendering
performance. We have also left out settings that are only valid for
parallel client-server rendering, which are discussed in
Section~\ref{sec:ParallelRenderParameters}.
......@@ -186,7 +181,8 @@ algorithm on a tiled display is a bit counterintuitive because the number
of pixels to composite is so large. However, IceT is designed to take
advantage of spatial locality in the data on each process to drastically
reduce the amount of compositing necessary. This spatial locality can be
enforced by applying the \menu{Filters > Alphabetical > D3} filter to your data.
enforced by applying the \menu{Filters > Alphabetical > D3}
filter to your data.
Because there is an overhead associated with parallel rendering, ParaView
has the ability to turn off parallel rendering at any time. When parallel