Commit 79d0e10a authored by Nicolas Vuaille's avatar Nicolas Vuaille

Update since Catalyst plugin was merged

parent 6daf0f6f
......@@ -1619,7 +1619,7 @@ ParaView source code under the Examples/Catalyst/CxxPVSMPipelineExample subdirec
For creating custom Catalyst Python pipelines, the simplest way is to start with
something that is fairly similar already. The easiest way to do that is to create
a similar pipeline in ParaView and export it using the Catalyst script generator
plugin (discussed in Section \ref{section:creatingscripts}). For the most part, these generated Python scripts are
(discussed in Section \ref{section:creatingscripts}). For the most part, these generated Python scripts are
very readable, especially if no screenshots are being output. Other useful ParaView
tools for creating and/or modifying Catalyst Python scripts include:
\begin{itemize}
......
......@@ -61,30 +61,23 @@ user but inevitably the user will want more functionality or better control. Thi
useful for the simulation user to create their own Catalyst Python scripts' pipeline using the
ParaView GUI.
There are two main prerequisites for creating Catalyst Python scripts in the ParaView GUI. The
first is that ParaView is built with the Catalyst Script Generator plugin enabled. This plugin was previously called
the CoProcessing Script Generator plugin for versions of ParaView before 4.2. Note that this plugin is
enabled by default when building ParaView from source as well as for versions of ParaView
installed from the available installers. Additionally, the version of ParaView used to generate the
script should also correspond to the version of ParaView Catalyst that the simulation code runs with. The
second prerequisite is that the user has a representative dataset to start from. What we mean
Note that the script generator used to be available through the CatalystScriptGenerator plugin
for versions of ParaView before 5.5, and is now natively embeded in ParaView.
There are two main prerequisites for creating Catalyst Python scripts in the ParaView GUI.
First, the version of ParaView used to generate the script should also correspond to the version
of ParaView Catalyst that the simulation code runs with.
The second prerequisite is that the user has a representative dataset to start from. What we mean
by this is that when reading the dataset from disk into ParaView that it is the same dataset type
(e.g. vtkUnstructuredGrid, vtkImageData, etc.) and has the same attributes defined over the
grids as the simulation adaptor code will provide to Catalyst during simulation runs. Ideally, the
geometry and the attribute ranges will be similar to what is provided by the simulation run's
configuration. The steps to create a Catalyst Python pipeline in the ParaView GUI are:
\begin{enumerate}
\item First load the ParaView plugin for creating the scripts. Do this by selecting ``Manage Plugins\ldots''
under the Tools menu (\menu{Tools > Manage Plugins\ldots}). In the window that pops up, select
CatalystScriptGeneratorPlugin and press the “Load Selected” button. After this, press the Close
button to close the window. This will create two new top-level menu items, \menu{Writers} and
\menu{CoProcessing}. Note that you can have the plugin automatically loaded when ParaView
starts up by expanding the CatalystScriptGeneratorPlugin information by clicking on the + sign in
the box to the left of it and then by checking the box to the right of Auto Load.
\item Next, load in a representative dataset and create a pipeline. In this case though, instead
\item First load in a representative dataset and create a pipeline. In this case though, instead
of actually writing the desired output to a file we need to specify when and where the
files will be created when running the simulation. For data extracts we specify at this
point that information by choosing an appropriate writer under the \menu{Writers} menu. The
point that information by choosing an appropriate writer under the \menu{Catalyst > Data Extract Writers} menu. The
user should specify a descriptive file name as well as a write frequency in the Properties
panel as shown in Figure~\ref{fig:pipeline}. The file name must contain a \%t in it as this gets
replaced by the time step when creating the file. Note that the step to specify screenshot
......@@ -99,7 +92,7 @@ the Slice filter. Since the writer is selected its file name and write frequency
\end{figure}
\item Once the full Catalyst pipeline has been created, the Python script must be exported
from ParaView. This is done by choosing the Export State wizard under the
CoProcessing menu (\menu{CoProcessing > Export State}). The user can click on the Next button in the initial window that
Catalyst menu (\menu{Catalyst > Generate Script}). The user can click on the Next button in the initial window that
pops up.
\item After that, the user must select the sources (i.e. pipeline objects without any input
connections) that the adaptor will create and add them to the output. Note that typically this
......@@ -243,7 +236,7 @@ The concept is that by saving an organized set of images into a Cinema database,
an analyst can perform \textit{post hoc} analysis and visualization directly from the
generated images. ParaView Catalyst can be used to create a Cinema database
and the specification of the Cinema output can be done through the ParaView GUI's
Catalyst Script Generator plugin. Figure~\ref{fig:cinemaexport} shows the
Catalyst Script Generator. Figure~\ref{fig:cinemaexport} shows the
expanded options when Output to Cinema is enabled. These options are:
\begin{itemize}
\item Export Type -- This option specifies how the view's camera should be manipulated
......
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