Commit 9682adb6 authored by Craig Scott's avatar Craig Scott

Tutorial: clean up typos, grammar and formatting

parent c1d5d5eb
......@@ -18,9 +18,9 @@ A Basic Starting Point (Step 1)
===============================
The most basic project is an executable built from source code files.
For simple projects, a three line CMakeLists file is all that is required.
This will be the starting point for our tutorial. Create a ``CMakeLists.txt``
file in the ``Step1`` directory that looks like:
For simple projects, a three line ``CMakeLists.txt`` file is all that is
required. This will be the starting point for our tutorial. Create a
``CMakeLists.txt`` file in the ``Step1`` directory that looks like:
.. code-block:: cmake
......@@ -33,7 +33,7 @@ file in the ``Step1`` directory that looks like:
add_executable(Tutorial tutorial.cxx)
Note that this example uses lower case commands in the CMakeLists file.
Note that this example uses lower case commands in the ``CMakeLists.txt`` file.
Upper, lower, and mixed case commands are supported by CMake. The source
code for ``tutorial.cxx`` is provided in the ``Step1`` directory and can be
used to compute the square root of a number.
......@@ -43,9 +43,9 @@ Adding a Version Number and Configured Header File
The first feature we will add is to provide our executable and project with a
version number. While we could do this exclusively in the source code, using
CMakeLists provides more flexibility.
``CMakeLists.txt`` provides more flexibility.
First, modify the CMakeLists file to set the version number.
First, modify the ``CMakeLists.txt`` file to set the version number.
.. literalinclude:: Step2/CMakeLists.txt
:language: cmake
......@@ -61,7 +61,7 @@ code:
Since the configured file will be written into the binary tree, we
must add that directory to the list of paths to search for include
files. Add the following lines to the end of the CMakeLists file:
files. Add the following lines to the end of the ``CMakeLists.txt`` file:
.. literalinclude:: Step2/CMakeLists.txt
:language: cmake
......@@ -103,8 +103,8 @@ Next let's add some C++11 features to our project by replacing ``atof`` with
We will need to explicitly state in the CMake code that it should use the
correct flags. The easiest way to enable support for a specific C++ standard
in CMake is by using the ``CMAKE_CXX_STANDARD`` variable. For this tutorial,
set the ``CMAKE_CXX_STANDARD`` variable in the CMakeLists file to 11 and
``CMAKE_CXX_STANDARD_REQUIRED`` to True:
set the ``CMAKE_CXX_STANDARD`` variable in the ``CMakeLists.txt`` file to 11
and ``CMAKE_CXX_STANDARD_REQUIRED`` to True:
.. literalinclude:: Step2/CMakeLists.txt
:language: cmake
......@@ -145,22 +145,22 @@ then use this library instead of the standard square root function provided by
the compiler.
For this tutorial we will put the library into a subdirectory
called MathFunctions. This directory already contains a header file,
called ``MathFunctions``. This directory already contains a header file,
``MathFunctions.h``, and a source file ``mysqrt.cxx``. The source file has one
function called ``mysqrt`` that provides similar functionality to the
compiler's ``sqrt`` function.
Add the following one line ``CMakeLists.txt`` file to the MathFunctions
Add the following one line ``CMakeLists.txt`` file to the ``MathFunctions``
directory:
.. literalinclude:: Step3/MathFunctions/CMakeLists.txt
:language: cmake
To make use of the new library we will add an ``add_subdirectory`` call in the
top-level CMakeLists file so that the library will get built. We add the new
library to the executable, and add MathFunctions as an include directory so
that the ``mqsqrt.h`` header file can be found. The last few lines of the
top-level CMakeLists file should now look like:
top-level ``CMakeLists.txt`` file so that the library will get built. We add
the new library to the executable, and add ``MathFunctions`` as an include
directory so that the ``mqsqrt.h`` header file can be found. The last few lines
of the top-level ``CMakeLists.txt`` file should now look like:
.. code-block:: cmake
......@@ -181,8 +181,8 @@ top-level CMakeLists file should now look like:
Now let us make the MathFunctions library optional. While for the tutorial
there really isn’t any need to do so, for larger projects this is a common
occurrence. The first step is to add an option to the top-level CMakeLists
file.
occurrence. The first step is to add an option to the top-level
``CMakeLists.txt`` file.
.. literalinclude:: Step3/CMakeLists.txt
:language: cmake
......@@ -195,8 +195,8 @@ the cache so that the user does not need to set the value each time they run
CMake on a build directory.
The next change is to make building and linking the MathFunctions library
conditional. To do this we change the end of the top-level CMakeLists file to
look like the following:
conditional. To do this we change the end of the top-level ``CMakeLists.txt``
file to look like the following:
.. literalinclude:: Step3/CMakeLists.txt
:language: cmake
......@@ -209,15 +209,15 @@ classic approach when dealing with many optional components, we will cover
the modern approach in the next step.
The corresponding changes to the source code are fairly straightforward. First,
in ``tutorial.cxx``, include the MathFunctions header if we need it:
in ``tutorial.cxx``, include the ``MathFunctions.h`` header if we need it:
.. literalinclude:: Step3/tutorial.cxx
:language: c++
:start-after: // should we include the MathFunctions header
:end-before: int main
Then, in the same file, make which square root function is used dependent on
``USE_MYMATH``:
Then, in the same file, make ``USE_MYMATH`` control which square root
function is used:
.. literalinclude:: Step3/tutorial.cxx
:language: c++
......@@ -268,7 +268,7 @@ doesn't. Add the following lines to the end of ``MathFunctions/CMakeLists.txt``:
Now that we've specified usage requirements for MathFunctions we can safely
remove our uses of the ``EXTRA_INCLUDES`` variable from the top-level
CMakeLists, here:
``CMakeLists.txt``, here:
.. literalinclude:: Step4/CMakeLists.txt
:language: cmake
......@@ -330,9 +330,9 @@ Verify that the installed Tutorial runs.
Testing Support
---------------
Next let's test our application. At the end of the top-level CMakeLists file we
can enable testing and then add a number of basic tests to verify that the
application is working correctly.
Next let's test our application. At the end of the top-level ``CMakeLists.txt``
file we can enable testing and then add a number of basic tests to verify that
the application is working correctly.
.. literalinclude:: Step5/CMakeLists.txt
:language: cmake
......@@ -344,7 +344,7 @@ test.
The next test makes use of the ``PASS_REGULAR_EXPRESSION`` test property to
verify that the output of the test contains certain strings. In this case,
verifying that the the usage message is printed when an incorrect number of
verifying that the usage message is printed when an incorrect number of
arguments are provided.
Lastly, we have a function called ``do_test`` that runs the application and
......@@ -370,9 +370,9 @@ tutorial assume that they are not common.
If the platform has ``log`` and ``exp`` then we will use them to compute the
square root in the ``mysqrt`` function. We first test for the availability of
these functions using the ``CheckSymbolExists.cmake`` macro in the top-level
CMakeLists. We're going to use the new defines in ``TutorialConfig.h.in``,
so be sure to set them before that file is configured.
these functions using the ``CheckSymbolExists`` module in the top-level
``CMakeLists.txt``. We're going to use the new defines in
``TutorialConfig.h.in``, so be sure to set them before that file is configured.
.. literalinclude:: Step6/MathFunctions/CMakeLists.txt
:language: cmake
......@@ -405,9 +405,8 @@ You will notice that we're not using ``log`` and ``exp``, even if we think they
should be available. We should realize quickly that we have forgotten to include
``TutorialConfig.h`` in ``mysqrt.cxx``.
We will also need to update MathFunctions/CMakeLists so ``mysqrt.cxx`` knows
where this file is located:
We will also need to update ``MathFunctions/CMakeLists.txt`` so ``mysqrt.cxx``
knows where this file is located:
.. code-block:: cmake
......@@ -432,10 +431,10 @@ other than in ``TutorialConfig.h``? Let's try to use
First, remove the defines from ``TutorialConfig.h.in``. We no longer need to
include ``TutorialConfig.h`` from ``mysqrt.cxx`` or the extra include in
MathFunctions/CMakeLists.
``MathFunctions/CMakeLists.txt``.
Next, we can move the check for ``HAVE_LOG`` and ``HAVE_EXP`` to
MathFunctions/CMakeLists and then add specify those values as ``PRIVATE``
``MathFunctions/CMakeLists.txt`` and then specify those values as ``PRIVATE``
compile definitions.
.. literalinclude:: Step6/MathFunctions/CMakeLists.txt
......@@ -444,7 +443,7 @@ compile definitions.
:end-before: # install rules
After making these updates, go ahead and build the project again. Run the
built Tutorial executable and verify that the results are same as earlier in
built Tutorial executable and verify that the results are same as earlier in
this step.
Adding a Custom Command and Generated File (Step 6)
......@@ -457,22 +456,23 @@ In this section, we will create the table as part of the build process,
and then compile that table into our application.
First, let's remove the check for the ``log`` and ``exp`` functions in
MathFunctions/CMakeLists. Then remove the check for ``HAVE_LOG`` and
``MathFunctions/CMakeLists.txt``. Then remove the check for ``HAVE_LOG`` and
``HAVE_EXP`` from ``mysqrt.cxx``. At the same time, we can remove
:code:`#include <cmath>`.
In the MathFunctions subdirectory, a new source file named ``MakeTable.cxx``
In the ``MathFunctions`` subdirectory, a new source file named ``MakeTable.cxx``
has been provided to generate the table.
After reviewing the file, we can see that the table is produced as valid C++
code and that the output filename is passed in as an argument.
The next step is to add the appropriate commands to MathFunctions CMakeLists
file to build the MakeTable executable and then run it as part of the build
process. A few commands are needed to accomplish this.
The next step is to add the appropriate commands to the
``MathFunctions/CMakeLists.txt`` file to build the MakeTable executable and
then run it as part of the build process. A few commands are needed to
accomplish this.
First, at the top of MathFunctions/CMakeLists, the executable for ``MakeTable``
is added as any other executable would be added.
First, at the top of ``MathFunctions/CMakeLists.txt``, the executable for
``MakeTable`` is added as any other executable would be added.
.. literalinclude:: Step7/MathFunctions/CMakeLists.txt
:language: cmake
......@@ -619,7 +619,7 @@ type must be specified::
Or, from an IDE, build the ``Experimental`` target.
Ctest will build and test the project and submit the results to the Kitware
``ctest`` will build and test the project and submit the results to the Kitware
public dashboard. The results of your dashboard will be uploaded to Kitware's
public dashboard here: https://my.cdash.org/index.php?project=CMakeTutorial.
......@@ -628,8 +628,8 @@ Mixing Static and Shared (Step 9)
In this section we will show how by using the ``BUILD_SHARED_LIBS`` variable
we can control the default behavior of ``add_library``, and allow control
over how libraries without an explicit type (STATIC/SHARED/MODULE/OBJECT) are
built.
over how libraries without an explicit type (``STATIC``, ``SHARED``, ``MODULE``
or ``OBJECT``) are built.
To accomplish this we need to add ``BUILD_SHARED_LIBS`` to the top-level
``CMakeLists.txt``. We use the ``option`` command as it allows users to
......@@ -678,10 +678,10 @@ Finally, update ``MathFunctions/MathFunctions.h`` to use dll export defines:
:language: c++
At this point, if you build everything, you will notice that linking fails
as we are combining a static library without position enabled code with a
library that has position enabled code. The solution to this is to explicitly
set the ``POSITION_INDEPENDENT_CODE`` target property of SqrtLibrary to be
True no matter the build type.
as we are combining a static library without position independent code with a
library that has position independent code. The solution to this is to
explicitly set the ``POSITION_INDEPENDENT_CODE`` target property of SqrtLibrary
to be True no matter the build type.
.. literalinclude:: Step10/MathFunctions/CMakeLists.txt
:language: cmake
......@@ -718,7 +718,7 @@ string, and ``<1:...>`` results in the content of "...". They can also be
nested.
A common usage of generator expressions is to conditionally add compiler
flags, such as those as language levels or warnings. A nice pattern is
flags, such as those for language levels or warnings. A nice pattern is
to associate this information to an ``INTERFACE`` target allowing this
information to propagate. Lets start by constructing an ``INTERFACE``
target and specifying the required C++ standard level of ``11`` instead
......@@ -816,19 +816,19 @@ directory and from an install / package. This means converting the
:start-after: # to find MathFunctions.h, while we don't.
:end-before: # should we use our own math functions
Once this has been updated, we can re-run CMake and see verify that it doesn't
Once this has been updated, we can re-run CMake and verify that it doesn't
warn anymore.
At this point, we have CMake properly packaging the target information that is
required but we will still need to generate a ``MathFunctionsConfig.cmake`` so
that the CMake ``find_package command`` can find our project. So let's go
that the CMake ``find_package`` command can find our project. So let's go
ahead and add a new file to the top-level of the project called
``Config.cmake.in`` with the following contents:
.. literalinclude:: Complete/Config.cmake.in
Then, to properly configure and install that file, add the following to the
bottom of the top-level CMakeLists:
bottom of the top-level ``CMakeLists.txt``:
.. literalinclude:: Complete/CMakeLists.txt
:language: cmake
......@@ -838,7 +838,7 @@ bottom of the top-level CMakeLists:
At this point, we have generated a relocatable CMake Configuration for our
project that can be used after the project has been installed or packaged. If
we want our project to also be used from a build directory we only have to add
the following to the bottom of the top level CMakeLists:
the following to the bottom of the top level ``CMakeLists.txt``:
.. literalinclude:: Complete/CMakeLists.txt
:language: cmake
......@@ -851,7 +851,7 @@ other projects, without needing it to be installed.
Import a CMake Project (Consumer)
=================================
This examples shows how a project can find other CMake packages that
This example shows how a project can find other CMake packages that
generate ``Config.cmake`` files.
It also shows how to state a project's external dependencies when generating
......@@ -860,22 +860,24 @@ a ``Config.cmake``.
Packaging Debug and Release (MultiPackage)
==========================================
By default CMake is model is that a build directory only contains a single
By default CMake's model is that a build directory only contains a single
configuration, be it Debug, Release, MinSizeRel, or RelWithDebInfo.
But it is possible to setup CPack to bundle multiple build directories at the
same time to build a package that contains multiple configurations of the
same project.
First we need to ahead and construct a directory called ``multi_config`` this
First we need to construct a directory called ``multi_config``, which
will contain all the builds that we want to package together.
Second create a ``debug`` and ``release`` directory underneath
``multi_config``. At the end you should have a layout that looks like:
─ multi_config
├── debug
└── release
.. code-block:: none
─ multi_config
├── debug
└── release
Now we need to setup debug and release builds, which would roughly entail
the following:
......@@ -891,8 +893,9 @@ the following:
cd ..
Now that both the debug and release builds are complete we can now use
the custom MultiCPackConfig to package both builds into a single release.
Now that both the debug and release builds are complete, we can use
a custom ``MultiCPackConfig.cmake`` file to package both builds into a single
release.
.. code-block:: console
......
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